Fiber Cable Manufacturer

TEL: +86-769-81209595
Categories
Contact Us

Add: No.101 B.S. Industrial Zone, Wangniudun Town, Dongguan City, Guangdong, China
Tel: +86-769-81209595
Mob: +8613242086178 (WeChat or Whatsapp)
E-mail: milton@hgcable.cc
Helen Golden: helen@hgcable.cc

288 Optical Fiber Cable

Underground duct installation – Fiber optic cables can be pulled through ducts, which protect the cables once they are buried.
Chat Now

1-288 cores  GYFTY non-metallic Fiber Optic Cable

Central strength member

1.5mm FRP

Outer diameter

Vary from 7 to 14mm

Application

aerial or duct cable networking system

Cores available

2,4,6,8,12,24,36,48,72,96,144,288

Cores type

G652D,G657A1,G657A2, G655C

OEM/ODM

Yes

Package

1/2/3/4/5km km each exporting wooden drums

Sheath

PE,HDPE

Learn more about fiber optical cable:

Here are a few common ways to install underground fiber-optic cable:

Underground duct installation – Fiber optic cables can be pulled through ducts, which protect the cables once they are buried. “Cable-jetting” is one way of installing the fiber optic cable is in the conduit via high-pressure air (the other would be simply pulling the line through);

Direct buried cable construction – Cable is installed directly into the ground instead of in protective pipelines/ducts;

Micro-trenching – Fiber optic cable is installed in pavement by way of a small groove in a street, sidewalk or parking lot. (Since we bury cable in the marsh, this isn’t something we do here at Stan’s.)

When we’re trenching in the marsh to lay fiber optic cables, we handle the cables in compliance with their stated design ratings to prevent damage during installation. Underground cable installation factors also include construction costs, time constraints, existing infrastructure and federal/state/local guidelines.

First, we perform a site survey and route analysis to evaluate soil content and identify all obstacles and water crossings. Regulations may require an Environmental Impact Study of the areas where we’ll be trenching. The next step in the process is to procure permits/licenses for all rights-of-way.

Generally, when we’re trenching for the fiber-optic line, we have to keep the trench as straight as possible (the utility companies have to observe what is called the “minimum bend radius” of the cable). The utilities also have to ground steel-armored cables and put the appropriate warning labels directly above the cable to alert people to the right of way.

How deep do these trenches need to be? Usually, they’re 12-36 inches below the surface. Up north, fiber cables have to go deeper than the frost line to prevent damage—that’s not a big consideration for us here in Louisiana, however.

Extending the useful distance

DARPA ORCA official concept art created c. 2008

The main reason terrestrial communications have been limited to non-commercial telecommunications functions is fog. Fog consistently keeps FSO laser links over 500 meters from achieving a year-round bit error rate of 1 per 100,000. Several entities are continually attempting to overcome these key disadvantages to FSO communications and field a system with a better quality of service. DARPA has sponsored over US$130 million in research towards this effort, with the ORCA and ORCLE programs.[13][14][15]

Other non-government groups are fielding tests to evaluate different technologies that some claim have the ability to address key FSO adoption challenges. As of October 2014, none have fielded a working system that addresses the most common atmospheric events.

FSO research from 1998–2006 in the private sector totaled $407.1 million, divided primarily among four start-up companies. All four failed to deliver products that would meet telecommunications quality and distance standards:[16]

Terabeam received approximately $575 million in funding from investors such as Softbank, Mobius Venture Capital and Oakhill Venture Partners. AT&T and Lucent backed this attempt.[17][18] The work ultimately failed, and the company was purchased in 2004 for $52 million (excluding warrants and options) by Falls Church, Va.-based YDI, effective June 22, 2004, and used the name Terabeam for the new entity. On September 4, 2007, Terabeam (then headquartered in San Jose, California) announced it would change its name to Proxim Wireless Corporation, and change its NASDAQ stock symbol from TRBM to PRXM. [19]

Hot Tags: 288 optical fiber cable, China, suppliers, manufacturers, factory
Related Products
  • Contact Us

    Add: No.101 B.S. Industrial Zone, Wangniudun Town, Dongguan City, Guangdong, China
    Tel: +86-769-81209595
    Mob: +8613242086178 (WeChat or Whatsapp)
    E-mail: milton@hgcable.cc
    Helen Golden: helen@hgcable.cc

  • Categories
  • Copyright © Dongguan Hongguang Cable Co.,Ltd All Rights Reserved.